What’s in a brain?

By Bill Ralston In Life

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29th November, 2012
You’ll be pleased to hear they’ve found Albert Einstein’s brain. Well, to be clear about this, they always knew where his brain was, sort of. When he died in 1955, a sneaky pathologist nicked it, pickled it and stuck it in a jar. He then chopped it up into more than 200 pieces and mailed them to researchers around the world. What was missing for half a century was a series of photographs the wily pathologist had taken of the brain before he sliced and diced it. Unfortunately for his career, the pathologist hadn’t asked Albert or his family’s permission before whipping the brain ...

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