Helen Clark named among “the most powerful women you’ve never heard of”

By Toby Manhire In The Internaut

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24th April, 2012 Leave a Comment

“The Angela Merkels and Dilma Rousseffs get all the attention,” runs the introduction. “But they’re not the only female leaders running the world.”

And so Foreign Policy, the esteemed 40-something-year-old journal – actually better described as a magazine these days – sets out to do something to educate us, with its list of “the most powerful women you’ve never heard of”.

First on the 25-strong list, which appears in the May/June issue, is one Helen Clark.

Her entry reads:

Less than a year following her departure as Kiwi prime minister, however, Clark turned to a much larger — and more challenging — stage: Since 2009, she has led the UN Development Program (UNDP), the arm of the United Nations charged with confronting the world’s worst problems, from global poverty to corrupt governance to health and environmental crises.

Clark, 62, now oversees the UNDP’s nearly $5 billion annual budget and more than 8,000 employees operating in 177 countries. Cholera in Haiti and famine in Somalia may be far from daily life for many New Zealanders, but Clark appears undaunted. Her top goal as administrator, she said last fall, is no less than to eradicate extreme poverty around the world.


H/T: @Saniac (“Why yes I have heard of Helen Clark actually”)

Less than a year following her departure as Kiwi prime minister, however, Clark turned to a much larger — and more challenging — stage: Since 2009, she has led the U.N. Development Program (UNDP), the arm of the United Nations charged with confronting the world’s worst problems, from global poverty to corrupt governance to health and environmental crises. Clark, 62, now oversees the UNDP’s nearly $5 billion annual budget and more than 8,000 employees operating in 177 countries. Cholera in Haiti and famine in Somalia may be far from daily life for many New Zealanders, but Clark appears undaunted. Her top goal as administrator, she said last fall, is no less than to eradicate extreme poverty around the world.Less than a year following her departure as Kiwi prime minister, however, Clark turned to a much larger — and more challenging — stage: Since 2009, she has led the U.N. Development Program (UNDP), the arm of the United Nations charged with confronting the world’s worst problems, from global poverty to corrupt governance to health and environmental crises. Clark, 62, now oversees the UNDP’s nearly $5 billion annual budget and more than 8,000 employees operating in 177 countries. Cholera in Haiti and famine in Somalia may be far from daily life for many New Zealanders, but Clark appears undaunted. Her top goal as administrator, she said last fall, is no less than to eradicate extreme poverty around the world.

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