Action stations: Experiments in contemporary art

By Mark Amery In Art

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28th February, 2013
Late last year, Te Papa bought for the national art collection documentation about a cabbage patch planted on the corner of Wellington’s Manners and Willis streets in 1978. If you need an official marker that contemporary art’s role as a politicised community-change agent is now centre-stage, these old cabbages could be it. Naturally, there was more to artist Barry Thomas’s Vacant Lot of Cabbages than it says on the label. As with the much later Occupy movement, when Thomas and friends cut through a perimeter fence, delivered a truckload of topsoil, planted 180 cabbages, installed ...

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