Dear Life by Alice Munro – review

By Paula Morris In Books

Print Share
3rd January, 2013
There’s always talk that Alice Munro – let’s call her the greatest living short-fiction writer in English, so you know right away where I stand on her work in general and this book in particular – is about to stop publishing. She’s 81, born in the same decade as the late John Updike and the late Raymond Carver, just a few years after William Trevor and James Salter. Dear Life is her 14th book, which means she’s published many more than Carver and many fewer than Trevor. Maybe the “last book ever” story is the invention of a publicist, eager for an angle that isn’t ...

Get full access to Listener.co.nz

Subscribers can read the full version of this story.

You can subscribe and get full online access for as little as $5 per week.

Enjoy the high-quality, in-depth journalism of the Listener magazine with convenient online access. This includes access to thousands of archived articles and up-to-date TV and entertainment listings.

Our great content is available online even before it hits the shelves, and includes more focus on breaking news. With our responsive design you get a great reader experience whether you read from your home computer, tablet, or even smartphone.

Already a subscriber? Just to read full version of this story.

Already an existing print subscriber? As part of your magazine subscription you are entitled to receive full access to the New Zealand Listener Online content. Click here for instructions on how to redeem your digital access.

Or you can subscribe now to get unlimited access to listener.co.nz.

More by Paula Morris

Switch to our mobile site