Hallucinations by Oliver Sacks – review

By Michael Corballis In Books

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3rd January, 2013
A curious feature of hallucinations is you can’t conjure them up at will. Yet they demonstrate the mind is stocked with images, and can produce involuntary but realistic perceptions that are immediate and vivid, to the point the perceiver mistakes the apparition for a real physical entity or the voice in the head as emanating from a real speaker. Nevertheless, they are often bizarre, and don’t correspond to actual events from the past. In contrast, you can consciously retrieve memories and even construct imaginary scenes, but these are diffuse and vague, and are not perceived as though happening ...

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