Lenin’s Kisses by Yan Lianke – review

By Sam Finnemore In Books

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3rd January, 2013
It starts in what seems like a rural utopia: a backwater village in a backwater Chinese county, missing from official maps since imperial days, Liven is a self-governed community of the disabled, with its own culture and slang built up over centuries of isolation. Co-operation and extraordinary physical skills honed though disability allow Liven a self-sufficient existence, and life proceeds simply but comfortably right up till the moment of a freak summer snowstorm. Crops fail, disaster ensues and officialdom duly makes a rare visit to Liven, with potentate Chief Liu bearing relief funds and ...

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