Paul Dibble: The Large Works – review

By Sally Blundell In Books

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13th October, 2012
They make for a strange cavalcade. Tui and huia, diggers and dancers, farmers, feathers and solitary jesters, slipping between abstraction and figuration, the weightiness of bronze and the ephemerality of the perforated plane. “I love stories,” says Palmerston North sculptor Paul Dibble. “Stories are the catalyst to get going, but eventually they have to be woven into an aesthetic language of scale, line and mass.” For over 35 years, Dibble has insinuated New Zealand folklore and landscape into a sculptural practice that draws on mythology, European art history, colonialism and ...

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