Shackleton’s Whisky by Neville Peat – review

By Nicholas Reid In Books

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3rd November, 2012
The cover photograph of Ernest Shackleton, taken in 1909, shows the doughty Edwardian explorer forcing a smile but looking shagged, battered and a little groggy. The poor blighter has just spent exhausting weeks slogging his way back to the coast from the Antarctic interior, after making it to within 100 miles of the Pole. But put that smile together with the cover’s bold-print word WHISKY and a shot of two bottles, and you’d swear that Sir Ernest was drunk. This is the paradox of Neville Peat’s Shackleton’s Whisky. Here’s this upright and genuinely teetotal hero, best known ...

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