India’s unmet domestic development needs

By Brian Easton In Economy

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16th April, 2011
In 1947, newly independent India embarked on a strategy of economic self-sufficiency in which domestic industry was protected from external competition behind high barriers. That reflected the fashion of the times, but also that Indian industry had had a pretty rough deal under colonial rule. It was a similar desire for independence and self-sufficiency that led to the proposal to make Hindi the sole official language. Nonetheless many regions of India are not Hindi-speaking. Tamil-speaking Tamil Nadu (formerly Madras state), where more speak English than Hindi, even threatened to leave ...

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