Recreating natural biodiversity in Waikato

By Joanne Black In Current Affairs

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28th January, 2012
If you get an invitation to Alana Scott’s family farm near Tirau, you had better pack your gumboots, just in case. It could be the day volunteers turn up to plant 20,000 young native trees and shrubs on the farm – around a natural peat lake considered one of the top 10 sites of ecological significance in the South Waikato. When the Scotts bought the 65ha farm, on which they mostly grow maize and grass but also have some dairy cows, every vestige of native bush was gone. “We want to recreate the natural biodiversity, improve the water quality and get the native birds to come back,” ...

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