Recreating natural biodiversity in Waikato

By Joanne Black In Current Affairs

Print Share
28th January, 2012
If you get an invitation to Alana Scott’s family farm near Tirau, you had better pack your gumboots, just in case. It could be the day volunteers turn up to plant 20,000 young native trees and shrubs on the farm – around a natural peat lake considered one of the top 10 sites of ecological significance in the South Waikato. When the Scotts bought the 65ha farm, on which they mostly grow maize and grass but also have some dairy cows, every vestige of native bush was gone. “We want to recreate the natural biodiversity, improve the water quality and get the native birds to come back,” ...

Get full access to Listener.co.nz

Subscribers can read the full version of this story.

You can subscribe and get full online access for as little as $5 per week.

Enjoy the high-quality, in-depth journalism of the Listener magazine with convenient online access. This includes access to thousands of archived articles and up-to-date TV and entertainment listings.

Our great content is available online even before it hits the shelves, and includes more focus on breaking news. With our responsive design you get a great reader experience whether you read from your home computer, tablet, or even smartphone.

Already a subscriber? Just to read full version of this story.

Already an existing print subscriber? As part of your magazine subscription you are entitled to receive full access to the New Zealand Listener Online content. Click here for instructions on how to redeem your digital access.

Or you can subscribe now to get unlimited access to listener.co.nz.

Switch to our mobile site