A short shark shock

By Rebecca Priestley In Science

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One of the most unlikely things I did last year was snorkelling with sharks. On previous snorkelling excursions, I’d been ready to get out of the water if I saw a shark. But here, in the Kermadec Islands, roughly halfway between New Zealand and Tonga, sharks were pretty much guaranteed. I was with a team of scientists, including Department of Conservation shark specialist Clinton Duffy, collecting seaweeds, coral and starfish from the waters around the Meyer Islands. It was August, and I’m not sure if the involuntary gasp I gave as I plunged into the water was because of the cold or ...

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