Commercial fishing to blame for Antarctic toothfish decline?

By Rebecca Priestley In Science

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18th August, 2012
The antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni) is not a pretty creature. These large ancient looking fish have enormous heads and a mouth full of teeth – useful when you’re the top fish predator in the Southern Ocean. Toothfish feed on many smaller species of fish and squid. Above them in the food chain are colossal squid and marine mammals like weddell seals and sperm whales. And now humans, too. For almost two decades, trawlers have been catching antarctic toothfish in the Southern Ocean, including in the Ross Sea directly south of New Zealand. Headless, gutted slabs of fish ...

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