Eco-restoration project at Tolaga Bay

By Rebecca Priestley In Science

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30th June, 2012
On June 6, after watching the transit of Venus from the newly restored Tolaga Bay wharf – the longest concrete wharf in the southern hemisphere, and “with the sweetest mussels” the locals say – I travelled to Tolaga Bay Area School, by the mouth of the Uawa River, and planted a koromiko. Around me, locals, Department of Conservation rangers, scientists and other visitors planted hundreds of ngaio, karo, flaxes, sedges and cabbage trees as part of an ecological restoration project that aims to restore the environment to how it was when James Cook arrived here in 1769. Cook’s first ...

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