Making the world go around

By Rebecca Priestley In Science

Print Share
4th April, 2013
A lively two-act play, And the Sun Stood Still, forms the heart of Dava Sobel’s latest work of science history, A More Perfect Heaven. The drama (and comedy) takes place in northern Poland in 1539 and opens with the bedridden Bishop of Varmia vomiting into a basin. He is attended by Nicolaus Copernicus, an aged mathematician and physician and a church canon. The bishop blames the kitchen staff for poisoning him – “That shifty-eyed cook must be a Lutheran sympathiser,” he rages – but recovers enough to demand that Copernicus choose between his “harlot” housekeeper ...

NZ Listener digital and print subscriptions

Thanks for your interest in this article.  To get your latest edition of the NZ Listener via a print subscription click here.

The NZ Listener is now also available via a Zinio digital experience – read the latest edition on your computer or via the Zinio app on your tablet.  To find our more click here.

Accessing archive content: If you’re interested in accessing archive content, please contact our NZ Listener helpdesk contact us.  We endeavor to get back to you within 5 working days.

If you already have an archive content login, please login to view and unlock content.

Any queries regarding access please contact our NZ Listener helpdesk contact us.

More by Rebecca Priestley

Switch to our mobile site