Splitters vs lumpers

By Rebecca Priestley In Science

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24th November, 2012
English botanist Joseph Hooker visited New Zealand only once, in 1841, but he had an enormous influence on the country’s botany. His catalogue of New Zealand’s plants, Flora Novae-Zelandiae, described 1800 species and became a lasting reference work. Some of the specimens he described were collected during his three months in New Zealand, but he also relied on local collectors who sent plants to him at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. In return, Hooker was generous with his thanks, but only to a point, says historian and fellow countryman Jim Endersby, who is speaking about ...

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