TV & Radio Wednesday March 28

By Fiona Rae In Today's TV and Radio

Print Share
28th March, 2012 Leave a Comment

TV

Siobhan Marshall in The Almighty Johnsons

The Almighty Johnsons (TV3, 8.30pm). Welcome back Siobhan Marshall! Pascalle West joins the cast of the Johnsons, although as usual, TV3 is being cagey about who she is and what she is doing. We presume she’s a goddess, from this unhelpful interview. She looks mad about something in the preview however.

Wikisecrets (History, Sky 073, 8.30pm). A doco about the US diplomatic cables that were leaked to the WikiLeaks website, allegedly by US Army analyst Bradley Manning. He is also said to have passed WikiLeaks footage of airstrikes in Baghdad and Afghanistan. Manning is currently under arrest in the US, and is to face court-martial. Among the charges is one of “aiding the enemy”, which is a capital offence, although prosecutors have told his lawyer they will not seek the death penalty. Wikisecrets includes interviews with Manning’s father, Brian, as well as WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

Sons of Anarchy (TV3, 9.30pm). Serious stuff, as the pressure on Juice (Theo Rossi) from the sheriff and AUSA Lincoln Potter (an excellently creepy Ray McKinnon) gets too much for him. Meanwhile, the gang war over the drugs gets worse, and Bobby challenges Clay for leadership of the club.

Justified (TV1, 10.55pm). It all ends with a shoot-out between the Bennetts and a Givens in tonight’s finale, and this episode is surely one of the reasons that Margo Martindale won an Emmy for her portrayal of hillbilly matriarch Mags. Also, Art gets to utter this line: “On the ground, hillbillies, now.

RADIO

Appointment (Radio New Zealand Concert, 7.00pm). US philosophers Ken Taylor and John Perry are back for part three of Philosophy Talk tonight and the conversation turns to Philosophy in Fiction. Writer-philosopher Rebecca Newberger Goldstein will be pondering such topics as: if philosophers think a lot about fiction, do novelists think about philosophy; do philosophers make good fictional characters; and can good stories be built around philosophical problems? – Diana Balham

More by Fiona Rae

Post a Comment

You must be to post a comment.

Switch to our mobile site