Misunderstood essential tremor

By Margo White In Health

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24th December, 2011
We all know about the shaking characteristic of high-profile movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, and the DTs that afflict those suffering withdrawal from the booze. Most of us tremble when we are tired, are scared, have had too much coffee or even try to hold our arms in front of us. Shaking, when you think about it, is a common aspect of the human condition. About 20 different tremor disorders are described in the medical literature, each with their own idiosyncratic causes and manifestations. There is orthostatic tremor, a high-frequency tremor of the legs that occurs when ...

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