The historical practice of trepanation

By Marc Wilson In Psychology

Print Share
15th September, 2012
Though psychology as a distinct discipline is typically considered to date back to 1879 when Wilhelm Wundt established the first psychology laboratory, its subject matter goes much further back. Our understanding of how people think and behave shapes how we deal with problems in how people think and behave, and a good example of this is the millennia-old practice of trepanation (or trephination) – making holes in the skull to alleviate psychological symptoms. In my psychology lectures on this for first-years, I show some skulls that have been holed, some square and raggedly saw-toothed at ...

NZ Listener digital and print subscriptions

Thanks for your interest in this article.  To get your latest edition of the NZ Listener via a print subscription click here.

The NZ Listener is now also available via a Zinio digital experience – read the latest edition on your computer or via the Zinio app on your tablet.  To find our more click here.

Accessing archive content: If you’re interested in accessing archive content, please contact our NZ Listener helpdesk contact us.  We endeavor to get back to you within 5 working days.

If you already have an archive content login, please login to view and unlock content.

Any queries regarding access please contact our NZ Listener helpdesk contact us.

More by Marc Wilson

Switch to our mobile site