Every cell thrumming …

By Kevin Rabalais In Uncategorized

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26th February, 2005
Short stories, much like life, always unravel a little hotter or colder than we anticipate. The form itself - closer in its trajectory to a poem or joke and meant to be read in a single sitting, unlike a novel - demands precision and efficiency on the writer's part and utmost concentration on the reader's. Two more generalisations. Good writers give us tangible details. They articulate aspects of our world that, though seemingly obvious, had hitherto remained slightly beyond our grasp. In Drowned Sprat, a collection of 23 stories written over 16 years, Stephanie Johnson's prose ...

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