Island in the sun

By Nicholas Reid In Uncategorized

Print Share
7th October, 2006
How do you convey in story the power and formative influence of literature? There are right ways and there are wrong ways. From this novel's set-up and its blurb, I feared Lloyd Jones might have chosen one of the wrong ways. Mister Pip's blurb says that the novel is "a love song to the power of the imagination and of storytelling. It shows how books can change lives." Here's the set-up. In Bougainville in the civil war in the early 1990s, regular schooling for village children is disrupted. Elderly eccentric Mr Watts, the last white man in the area, agrees to become ...

Get full access to Listener.co.nz

Subscribers can read the full version of this story.

You can subscribe and get full online access for as little as $5 per week.

Enjoy the high-quality, in-depth journalism of the Listener magazine with convenient online access. This includes access to thousands of archived articles and up-to-date TV and entertainment listings.

Our great content is available online even before it hits the shelves, and includes more focus on breaking news. With our responsive design you get a great reader experience whether you read from your home computer, tablet, or even smartphone.

Already a subscriber? Just to read full version of this story.

Already an existing print subscriber? As part of your magazine subscription you are entitled to receive full access to the New Zealand Listener Online content. Click here for instructions on how to redeem your digital access.

Or you can subscribe now to get unlimited access to listener.co.nz.

Switch to our mobile site